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Meta-analysis of Tablet-Mediated Interventions for Teaching Academic Skills to Individuals with Autism

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, April 2018
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
Meta-analysis of Tablet-Mediated Interventions for Teaching Academic Skills to Individuals with Autism
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, April 2018
DOI 10.1007/s10803-018-3573-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine Ledbetter-Cho, Mark O’Reilly, Russell Lang, Laci Watkins, Nataly Lim

Abstract

Portable touch-screen devices have been the focus of a notable amount of intervention research involving individuals with autism. Additionally, popular media has widely circulated claims that such devices and academic software applications offer tremendous educational benefits. A systematic search identified 19 studies that targeted academic skills for individuals with autism. Most studies used the device's built-in video recording or camera function to create customized teaching materials, rather than commercially-available applications. Analysis of potential moderating variables indicated that participants' age and functioning level did not influence outcomes. However, participant operation of the device, as opposed to operation by an instructor, produced significantly larger effect size estimates. Results are discussed in terms of recommendations for practitioners and future research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 9 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 25%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 11 34%
Social Sciences 5 16%
Psychology 4 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Other 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,360,784
of 13,337,884 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#2,607
of 3,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,782
of 270,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#76
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,337,884 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,262 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.