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Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling

Overview of attention for article published in Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology, February 2016
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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Citations

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37 Mendeley
Title
Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling
Published in
Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00253-016-7302-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

H. Máté de Gérando, F. Fayolle-Guichard, L. Rudant, S. K. Millah, F. Monot, Nicolas Lopes Ferreira, A. M. López-Contreras

Abstract

Random mutagenesis and genome shuffling was applied to improve solvent tolerance and isopropanol/butanol/ethanol (IBE) production in the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423. Following chemical mutagenesis with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG), screening of putatively improved strains was done by submitting the mutants to toxic levels of inhibitory chemicals or by screening for their tolerance to isopropanol (>35 g/L). Suicide substrates, such as ethyl or methyl bromobutyrate or alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitors like allyl alcohol, were tested and, finally, 36 mutants were isolated. The fermentation profiles of these NTG mutant strains were characterized, and the best performing mutants were used for consecutive rounds of genome shuffling. Screening of strains with further enhancement in isopropanol tolerance at each recursive shuffling step was then used to spot additionally improved strains. Three highly tolerant strains were finally isolated and able to withstand up to 50 g/L isopropanol on plates. Even if increased tolerance to the desired end product was not always accompanied by higher production capabilities, some shuffled strains showed increased solvent titers compared to the parental strains and the original C. beijerinckii DSM 6423. This study confirms the efficiency of genome shuffling to generate improved strains toward a desired phenotype such as alcohol tolerance. This tool also offers the possibility of obtaining improved strains of Clostridium species for which targeted genetic engineering approaches have not been described yet.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
New Zealand 1 3%
Unknown 35 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 24%
Student > Master 7 19%
Unspecified 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 32%
Unspecified 7 19%
Environmental Science 3 8%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2016.
All research outputs
#2,493,900
of 9,361,690 outputs
Outputs from Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology
#384
of 2,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,366
of 98,829 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology
#12
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,361,690 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,634 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 98,829 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.