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TASTE RECEPTOR T1R3 IS AN ESSENTIAL MOLECULE FOR THE CELLULAR RECOGNITION OF THE DISACCHARIDE TREHALOSE

Overview of attention for article published in In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal, January 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 346)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

patent
8 patents
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
TASTE RECEPTOR T1R3 IS AN ESSENTIAL MOLECULE FOR THE CELLULAR RECOGNITION OF THE DISACCHARIDE TREHALOSE
Published in
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal, January 2003
DOI 10.1290/1543-706x(2003)039<0080:trtiae>2.0.co;2
Pubmed ID
Authors

TOSHIO ARIYASU, SHUJI MATSUMOTO, FUMIYO KYONO, TOSHIHARU HANAYA, SHIGEYUKI ARAI, MASAO IKEDA, MASASHI KURIMOTO

Abstract

Recently, a sweet taste receptor family, the T1R family, that recognizes some carbohydrates including sucrose was identified. Although the T1R3 molecule is known to participate in heterodimers that are used as sweet- and umami-tasting receptors, there is no evidence that T1R3 alone recognizes similar ligands. We demonstrate for the first time that the candidate sweet taste receptor T1R3 is essential for the recognition and response to the disaccharide trehalose. Our system is a valuable tool not only for understanding the relationship between sweeteners and their receptors but also for exploring the diversities of their receptors, resulting in the design of new high-potency sweeteners.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 7%
Unknown 13 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Unspecified 2 14%
Student > Master 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 21%
Unspecified 1 7%
Unknown 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2012.
All research outputs
#1,729,911
of 10,388,628 outputs
Outputs from In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal
#12
of 346 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,068
of 253,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age from In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Animal
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,388,628 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 346 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,182 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.