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Negative Electron Transfer Dissociation Sequencing of 3-O-Sulfation-Containing Heparan Sulfate Oligosaccharides

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, March 2018
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3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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11 Mendeley
Title
Negative Electron Transfer Dissociation Sequencing of 3-O-Sulfation-Containing Heparan Sulfate Oligosaccharides
Published in
Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, March 2018
DOI 10.1007/s13361-018-1907-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jiandong Wu, Juan Wei, John D. Hogan, Pradeep Chopra, Apoorva Joshi, Weigang Lu, Joshua Klein, Geert-Jan Boons, Cheng Lin, Joseph Zaia

Abstract

Among dissociation methods, negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) has been proven the most useful for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sequencing because it produces informative fragmentation, a low degree of sulfate losses, high sensitivity, and translatability to multiple instrument types. The challenge, however, is to distinguish positional sulfation. In particular, NETD has been reported to fail to differentiate 4-O- versus 6-O-sulfation in chondroitin sulfate decasaccharide. This raised the concern of whether NETD is able to differentiate the rare 3-O-sulfation from predominant 6-O-sulfation in heparan sulfate (HS) oligosaccharides. Here, we report that NETD generates highly informative spectra that differentiate sites of O-sulfation on glucosamine residues, enabling structural characterizations of synthetic HS isomers containing 3-O-sulfation. Further, lyase-resistant 3-O-sulfated tetrasaccharides from natural sources were successfully sequenced. Notably, for all of the oligosaccharides in this study, the successful sequencing is based on NETD tandem mass spectra of commonly observed deprotonated precursor ions without derivatization or metal cation adduction, simplifying the experimental workflow and data interpretation. These results demonstrate the potential of NETD as a sensitive analytical tool for detailed, high-throughput structural analysis of highly sulfated GAGs. Graphical Abstract.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 27%
Professor 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 3 27%
Unspecified 2 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 18%
Computer Science 1 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Other 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,632,199
of 12,788,180 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
#1,314
of 2,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,633
of 274,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
#24
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,788,180 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,209 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,177 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.