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Are Personality Characteristics as Measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) Associated with Obesity Treatment Outcomes? A Systematic Review

Overview of attention for article published in Current Obesity Reports, February 2018
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Title
Are Personality Characteristics as Measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) Associated with Obesity Treatment Outcomes? A Systematic Review
Published in
Current Obesity Reports, February 2018
DOI 10.1007/s13679-018-0294-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Riccardo Dalle Grave, Simona Calugi, Marwan El Ghoch

Abstract

Some personality traits seem to be associated with obesity, but there is little information available regarding their association with obesity treatment outcomes. The aim of this systematic review was therefore to assess the associations between personality traits-evaluated by means of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI)-and outcomes of obesity treatment, including attrition, weight loss, and weight loss maintenance. The PubMed database was searched, and studies were screened as per the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, and data were collated using a narrative approach. Of the 886 articles retrieved, 9 studies assessing personality traits by means of the TCI in participants with obesity met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. This approach revealed three main findings: (i) only one study found that attrition rate-during a 6-month behavioral weight loss program-is predicted by low reward dependence scores at baseline; (ii) two studies found that lower novelty-seeking and higher self-directedness scores at baseline positively predict short-term weight-loss magnitude; and (iii) four studies found that higher persistence and lower novelty-seeking scores at baseline predicted weight maintenance at 12 and 24 months. Novelty-seeking and self-directedness traits appear to be predictors of short-term weight loss (≤ 6 months), and persistence and novelty-seeking traits may be related to long-term weight loss maintenance (≥ 12 months), although great uncertainty still exists regarding predictors of attrition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 25%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 50%
Psychology 3 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2018.
All research outputs
#9,759,276
of 12,733,544 outputs
Outputs from Current Obesity Reports
#199
of 256 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#231,230
of 347,330 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Obesity Reports
#9
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,733,544 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 256 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.3. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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