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High-intensity aerobic interval training can lead to improvement in skeletal muscle power among in-hospital patients with advanced heart failure

Overview of attention for article published in Heart & Vessels, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
Title
High-intensity aerobic interval training can lead to improvement in skeletal muscle power among in-hospital patients with advanced heart failure
Published in
Heart & Vessels, January 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00380-018-1120-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Masanobu Taya, Eisuke Amiya, Masaru Hatano, Hisataka Maki, Daisuke Nitta, Akihito Saito, Masaki Tsuji, Yumiko Hosoya, Shun Minatsuki, Atsuko Nakayama, Takayuki Fujiwara, Yuto Konishi, Kazuhiko Yokota, Masafumi Watanabe, Hiroyuki Morita, Nobuhiko Haga, Issei Komuro

Abstract

This study investigated the effectiveness and safety of interval training during in-hospital treatment of patients with advanced heart failure. Twenty-four consecutive patients with advanced symptomatic heart failure who were referred for cardiac transplant evaluation were recruited. After performing aerobic exercise for approximate intensity, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) was performed. The protocol consisted of 3 or 4 sessions of 1-min high-intensity exercise aimed at 80% of peak VO2 or 80% heart rate reserve, followed by 4-min recovery periods of low intensity. In addition to the necessary laboratory data, hand grip strength and knee extensor strength were evaluated at the start of exercise training and both at the start and the end of HIIT. Knee extensor strength was standardized by body weight. The BNP level at the start of exercise training was 432 (812) pg/mL and it significantly decreased to 254 (400) pg/mL (p < 0.001) at the end of HIIT. Hand grip strength did not change during course. By contrast, knee extensor strength significantly increased during HIIT [4.42 ± 1.43 → 5.28 ± 1.45 N/kg, p < 0.001], whereas the improvement of knee extensor strength was not significant from the start of exercise training to the start of HIIT. In addition, the change in knee extensor strength during HIIT was significantly associated with the hemoglobin A1c level at the start of exercise (R = - 0.55; p = 0.015). HIIT has a positive impact on skeletal muscle strength among in-hospital patients with advanced heart failure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 25%
Unspecified 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 10 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 25%
Sports and Recreations 7 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 17%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,432,519
of 12,444,666 outputs
Outputs from Heart & Vessels
#110
of 355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,018
of 339,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Heart & Vessels
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,444,666 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 355 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,364 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.