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Plasmodium (Haemamoeba) cathemerium gene sequences for phylogenetic analysis of malaria parasites

Overview of attention for article published in Parasitology Research, April 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
Title
Plasmodium (Haemamoeba) cathemerium gene sequences for phylogenetic analysis of malaria parasites
Published in
Parasitology Research, April 2005
DOI 10.1007/s00436-005-1324-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. C. Wiersch, W. A. Maier, H. Kampen

Abstract

The DNA sequence information on avian malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium is quite limited. At present, sequences of only 6 out of 34 valid species are available. However, sequence data of avian malaria parasites are particularly important with regard to the resolution of the phylogenetic relationships of the most virulent human malaria agent, Plasmodium falciparum. The question as to whether P. falciparum originates from avian or from mammalian parasites would contribute to our understanding of its biology and would probably facilitate the interpretation of experimental results. To add to the body of molecular data, we sequenced three genes (cytochrome b, 18 SSU rRNA, caseinolytic protease C) of different organellar origin of one of the most widespread avian malaria parasites, Plasmodium (Haemamoeba) cathemerium, which once used to be an important laboratory in vivo model in human malaria research. The analysis of the new P. cathemerium sequences in direct comparison with the rodent parasite P. berghei and the four human malaria parasites by pairwise distance calculation do not suggest a closer relationship of P. cathemerium to P. falciparum than to the other species involved.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 4%
United States 2 4%
Bulgaria 1 2%
Lithuania 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Unknown 49 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Student > Master 11 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Unspecified 5 9%
Environmental Science 5 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Other 2 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2017.
All research outputs
#3,498,672
of 12,221,286 outputs
Outputs from Parasitology Research
#289
of 2,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,520
of 271,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasitology Research
#10
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,221,286 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,447 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.