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Insular Cortex is Critical for the Perception, Modulation, and Chronification of Pain

Overview of attention for article published in Neuroscience Bulletin, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
Title
Insular Cortex is Critical for the Perception, Modulation, and Chronification of Pain
Published in
Neuroscience Bulletin, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s12264-016-0016-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Changbo Lu, Tao Yang, Huan Zhao, Ming Zhang, Fancheng Meng, Hao Fu, Yingli Xie, Hui Xu

Abstract

An increasing body of neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies of the brain suggest that the insular cortex (IC) integrates multimodal salient information ranging from sensation to cognitive-affective events to create conscious interoception. Especially with regard to pain experience, the IC has been supposed to participate in both sensory-discriminative and affective-motivational aspects of pain. In this review, we discuss the latest data proposing that subregions of the IC are involved in isolated pain networks: the posterior sensory circuit and the anterior emotional network. Due to abundant connections with other brain areas, the IC is likely to serve as an interface where cross-modal shaping of pain occurs. In chronic pain, however, this mode of emotional awareness and the modulation of pain are disrupted. We highlight some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the changes of the pain modulation system that contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain in the IC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
China 1 1%
Unknown 95 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 21%
Student > Master 21 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 17%
Unspecified 12 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 10%
Other 17 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 29 30%
Unspecified 18 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 17%
Psychology 10 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 7%
Other 17 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,233,729
of 12,358,097 outputs
Outputs from Neuroscience Bulletin
#68
of 303 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,139
of 355,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuroscience Bulletin
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,358,097 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 303 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,103 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them