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Water pulses and biogeochemical cycles in arid and semiarid ecosystems

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, February 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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798 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
850 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Water pulses and biogeochemical cycles in arid and semiarid ecosystems
Published in
Oecologia, February 2004
DOI 10.1007/s00442-004-1519-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy T. Austin, Laura Yahdjian, John M. Stark, Jayne Belnap, Amilcare Porporato, Urszula Norton, Damián A. Ravetta, Sean M. Schaeffer

Abstract

The episodic nature of water availability in arid and semiarid ecosystems has significant consequences on belowground carbon and nutrient cycling. Pulsed water events directly control belowground processes through soil wet-dry cycles. Rapid soil microbial response to incident moisture availability often results in almost instantaneous C and N mineralization, followed by shifts in C/N of microbially available substrate, and an offset in the balance between nutrient immobilization and mineralization. Nitrogen inputs from biological soil crusts are also highly sensitive to pulsed rain events, and nitrogen losses, particularly gaseous losses due to denitrification and nitrate leaching, are tightly linked to pulses of water availability. The magnitude of the effect of water pulses on carbon and nutrient pools, however, depends on the distribution of resource availability and soil organisms, both of which are strongly affected by the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of vegetation cover, topographic position and soil texture. The 'inverse texture hypothesis' for net primary production in water-limited ecosystems suggests that coarse-textured soils have higher NPP than fine-textured soils in very arid zones due to reduced evaporative losses, while NPP is greater in fine-textured soils in higher rainfall ecosystems due to increased water-holding capacity. With respect to belowground processes, fine-textured soils tend to have higher water-holding capacity and labile C and N pools than coarse-textured soils, and often show a much greater flush of N mineralization. The result of the interaction of texture and pulsed rainfall events suggests a corollary hypothesis for nutrient turnover in arid and semiarid ecosystems with a linear increase of N mineralization in coarse-textured soils, but a saturating response for fine-textured soils due to the importance of soil C and N pools. Seasonal distribution of water pulses can lead to the accumulation of mineral N in the dry season, decoupling resource supply and microbial and plant demand, and resulting in increased losses via other pathways and reduction in overall soil nutrient pools. The asynchrony of resource availability, particularly nitrogen versus water due to pulsed water events, may be central to understanding the consequences for ecosystem nutrient retention and long-term effects on carbon and nutrient pools. Finally, global change effects due to changes in the nature and size of pulsed water events and increased asynchrony of water availability and growing season will likely have impacts on biogeochemical cycling in water-limited ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 850 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 28 3%
Argentina 7 <1%
Spain 4 <1%
Australia 4 <1%
China 4 <1%
South Africa 4 <1%
Mexico 3 <1%
France 3 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
Other 22 3%
Unknown 768 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 204 24%
Researcher 203 24%
Student > Master 119 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 65 8%
Student > Bachelor 57 7%
Other 202 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 353 42%
Environmental Science 280 33%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 99 12%
Unspecified 76 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 1%
Other 31 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2019.
All research outputs
#2,024,808
of 13,595,754 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#435
of 2,925 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,727
of 279,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#6
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,595,754 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,925 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,038 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.