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Change in spring arrival of migratory birds under an era of climate change, Swedish data from the last 140 years

Overview of attention for article published in Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
Title
Change in spring arrival of migratory birds under an era of climate change, Swedish data from the last 140 years
Published in
Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment, January 2015
DOI 10.1007/s13280-014-0600-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cecilia Kullberg, Thord Fransson, Johanna Hedlund, Niclas Jonzén, Ola Langvall, Johan Nilsson, Kjell Bolmgren

Abstract

Many migratory bird species have advanced their spring arrival during the latest decades, most probably due to climate change. However, studies on migratory phenology in the period before recent global warming are scarce. We have analyzed a historical dataset (1873-1917) of spring arrival to southern and central Sweden of 14 migratory bird species. In addition, we have used relative differences between historical and present-day observations (1984-2013) to evaluate the effect of latitude and migratory strategy on day of arrival over time. There was a larger change in spring phenology in short-distance migrants than in long-distance migrants. Interestingly, the results further suggest that climate change has affected the phenology of short-distance migrants more in southern than in central Sweden. The results suggest that the much earlier calculated arrival to southern Sweden among short-distance migrants mirrors a change in location of wintering areas, hence, connecting migration phenology and wintering range shifts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Mexico 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 81 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 26%
Student > Master 16 18%
Researcher 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Unspecified 8 9%
Other 18 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 57%
Environmental Science 20 22%
Unspecified 9 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 3 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2015.
All research outputs
#636,897
of 10,668,595 outputs
Outputs from Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment
#81
of 715 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,215
of 250,179 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment
#3
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,668,595 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 715 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,179 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.