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Autologous transplantation of CD34+ bone marrow derived mononuclear cells in management of non-reconstructable critical lower limb ischemia

Overview of attention for article published in Cytotechnology, December 2014
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Title
Autologous transplantation of CD34+ bone marrow derived mononuclear cells in management of non-reconstructable critical lower limb ischemia
Published in
Cytotechnology, December 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10616-014-9828-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ahmed M. Ismail, Said M. Abdou, Hassan Abdel Aty, Adel H. Kamhawy, Mohammed Elhinedy, Mohammed Elwageh, Atef Taha, Amal Ezzat, Hoda A. Salem, Said Youssif, Mohamed L. Salem

Abstract

Patients with a decrease in limb perfusion with a potential threat to limb viability manifested by ischemic rest pain, ischemic ulcers, and/or gangrene are considered to have critical limb ischemia (CLI). Because of this generally poor outcome, there is a strong need for attempting any procedure to save the affected limb. The aim of this work is to evaluate the possibility to use stem cell therapy as a treatment option for patients with chronic critical lower limb ischemia with no distal run off. This study includes 20 patients with chronic critical lower limb ischemia with no distal run off who are unsuitable for vascular or endovascular option. These patients underwent stem cell therapy (SCT) by autologous transplantation of bone marrow derived mononuclear cells. 55 % of patients treated with SCT showed improvement of the rest pain after the first month, 60 % continued improvement of the rest pain after 6 months, 75 % after 1 year and 80 % after 2 years and continued without any deterioration till the third year. Limb salvage rate after STC was 80 % after the first year till the end of the second and third years. SCT can result in angiogenesis in patients with no-option CLI, providing a foundation for the application of this therapy to leg ischemia.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Unknown 11 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 25%
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 17%
Other 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 75%
Unspecified 2 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2014.
All research outputs
#10,938,803
of 12,342,655 outputs
Outputs from Cytotechnology
#522
of 588 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,768
of 270,824 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cytotechnology
#13
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,342,655 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 588 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,824 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.