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A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of minocycline and/or omega-3 fatty acids added to treatment as usual for at-risk mental states (NAYAB): study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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3 Dimensions

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mendeley
56 Mendeley
Title
A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of minocycline and/or omega-3 fatty acids added to treatment as usual for at-risk mental states (NAYAB): study protocol
Published in
Trials, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13063-017-2275-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Inti Qurashi, Imran B. Chaudhry, Ameer B. Khoso, Sana Farooque, Steve Lane, Mohammad Omair Husain, Simon Chu, Jane Sarginson, Munir Hamarani, Haider A. Naqvi, Bushra Razzaque, Fareed A. Minhas, Alison R. Yung, J. F. W. Deakin, Nusrat Husain

Abstract

The at-risk mental state (ARMS) describes individuals at high risk of developing schizophrenia or psychosis. The use of antipsychotics in this population is not supported, because most individuals with ARMS are unlikely to develop psychosis. Anti-inflammatory treatments and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may have some beneficial effects in the treatment of ARMS. There have been no controlled clinical trials in which researchers have investigated the use of minocycline for ARMS and no trials involving PUFAs in combination with other proposed treatments. There is a need to find effective, tolerable and inexpensive interventions for individuals with ARMS that are available in high-, low- and middle-income countries. A 6-month intervention study of minocycline and/or omega-3 fatty acids added to treatment as usual (TAU) in patients with ARMS will be conducted in Pakistan using a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind factorial design. A total of 320 consenting patients with capacity will be recruited from the community, general practitioner clinics and psychiatric units. Allowing for a 25% dropout rate, we will recruit 59 completing participants into each study arm, and in total 236 will complete the study. We will determine whether the addition of minocycline and/or omega-3 fatty acids to TAU attenuates the rate of transition from ARMS to first-episode psychosis and improves symptoms and/or level of functioning in ARMS. We will also investigate whether any candidate risk factors, such as negative symptoms, influence treatment response in the ARMS group. The primary efficacy endpoint is conversion to psychotic disorder at 12 months after study entry. Analysis will be done according to the intention to treat principle using analysis of variance, chi-square tests and adjusted ORs to assess between-group differences. Cox regression analysis will be used to evaluate potential between-group differences in time to onset of psychosis. The outcomes of this trial will provide evidence of the potential benefits of minocycline and PUFAs in the treatment of ARMS. Both minocycline and PUFAs are inexpensive, are readily available in low-/middle-income countries such as Pakistan, and if proven, may be safe and effective for treating individuals with ARMS. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02569307 . Registered on 3 October 2015.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 12 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 18%
Student > Master 9 16%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Other 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 18 32%
Psychology 14 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Other 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2017.
All research outputs
#2,731,043
of 12,184,158 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#970
of 2,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,138
of 337,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#68
of 248 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,184,158 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,935 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 337,620 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 248 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.