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The content validity of the PSS in patients with plaque psoriasis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes, September 2017
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Title
The content validity of the PSS in patients with plaque psoriasis
Published in
Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41687-017-0004-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. M. Rentz, A. M. Skalicky, K. Burslem, K. Becker, D. Kaschinski, D. Esser, D. A. Revicki

Abstract

The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the content validity of the Psoriasis Symptom Scale (PSS), with a specific focus on understanding of the content of the PRO measure by conducting one-on-one interviews with patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. This was a cross-sectional, qualitative study conducted with 20 patients with plaque psoriasis who participated in in-person, one-on-one interviews. Participants were asked to describe their psoriasis symptoms, completed the PSS, and were cognitively debriefed on its content. Interviews were conducted in two separate rounds. Following Round 1, the study data were examined to determine if modifications to the PSS were required. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected for sample descriptive purposes. The 20 study participants had a mean age of 50.2 ± 12.0 years (range: 25.0-73.0), and 55% were female. Thirty-five percent of the sample reported their psoriasis severity as moderate or severe. The average time since diagnosis of plaque psoriasis was almost 18 years, ranging from less than one to over 38 years. The most frequently reported symptoms and signs during the concept elicitation portion of the interviews included redness (N = 20, 100%), itching (n = 20, 100%), pain (n = 15, 75%), burning (n = 13, 65%), and flaking (n = 11, 55%). Overall, participants provided positive feedback on the PSS and felt that it was comprehensive and relevant to their experience with psoriasis. The item meaning and response options were well-understood for the majority of the items. Findings indicate that for the patient-reported symptom of redness, which is also a sign that can be reported by clinicians, redness or the perception of redness is most accurately captured by patient report. Study results did not support modifications to the instrument and no changes to the PSS were recommended. The evidence gained in this study provided support for the content validity of the PSS for use as clinical trial endpoint among patients with plaque psoriasis. This study found that the symptoms included in the PSS are important to and well-understood by patients with plaque psoriasis. The PSS is appropriate for inclusion in future studies designed to measure the effect of treatment on psoriasis-related symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Professor 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 6 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 20%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 15%
Psychology 2 10%
Unspecified 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 6 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2017.
All research outputs
#18,576,855
of 23,008,860 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes
#392
of 503 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#242,465
of 315,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Patient-Reported Outcomes
#4
of 4 outputs
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