↓ Skip to main content

Improved production of poly(lactic acid)-like polyester based on metabolite analysis to address the rate-limiting step

Overview of attention for article published in AMB Express, November 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
Title
Improved production of poly(lactic acid)-like polyester based on metabolite analysis to address the rate-limiting step
Published in
AMB Express, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13568-014-0083-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ken’ichiro Matsumoto, Kota Tobitani, Shunsuke Aoki, Yuyang Song, Toshihiko Ooi, Seiichi Taguchi

Abstract

The biosynthesis of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-like polymers, composed of >99 mol% lactate and a trace amount of 3-hydroxybutyrate, in engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum consists of two steps; the generation of the monomer substrate lactyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase-catalyzed polymerization of lactyl-CoA. In order to increase polymer productivity, we explored the rate-limiting step in PLA-like polymer synthesis based on quantitative metabolite analysis using liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). A significant pool of lactyl-CoA was found during polymer synthesis. This result suggested that the rate-limitation occurred at the polymerization step. Accordingly, the expression level of PHA synthase was increased by means of codon-optimization of the corresponding gene that consequently led to an increase in polymer content by 4.4-fold compared to the control. Notably, the codon-optimization did not significantly affect the concentration of lactyl-CoA, suggesting that the polymerization reaction was still the rate-limiting step upon the overexpression of PHA synthase. Another important finding was that the generation of lactyl-CoA was concomitant with a decrease in the acetyl-CoA level, indicating that acetyl-CoA served as a CoA donor for lactyl-CoA synthesis. These results show that obtaining information on the metabolite concentrations is highly useful for improving PLA-like polymer production. This strategy should be applicable to a wide range of PHA-producing systems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 3%
China 1 3%
Unknown 31 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Student > Master 2 6%
Student > Bachelor 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 24%
Chemistry 4 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2014.
All research outputs
#17,220,022
of 21,321,365 outputs
Outputs from AMB Express
#761
of 1,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#249,317
of 346,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AMB Express
#30
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,365 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,176 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,500 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.