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The risk of eating disorders and bone health in young adults: the mediating role of body composition and fitness

Overview of attention for article published in Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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10 Mendeley
Title
The risk of eating disorders and bone health in young adults: the mediating role of body composition and fitness
Published in
Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity, November 2017
DOI 10.1007/s40519-017-0458-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Miriam Garrido-Miguel, Ana Torres-Costoso, María Martínez-Andrés, Blanca Notario-Pacheco, Ana Díez-Fernández, Celia Álvarez-Bueno, Jorge Cañete García-Prieto, Vicente Martínez-Vizcaíno

Abstract

To analyze the independent relationship between the risk of eating disorders and bone health and to examine whether this relationship is mediated by body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). In this cross-sectional study, bone-related variables, lean mass, fat mass (by DXA), risk of eating disorders (SCOFF questionnaire), height, weight, waist circumference and CRF were measured in 487 university students aged 18-30 years from the University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. ANCOVA models were estimated to test mean differences in bone mass categorized by body composition, CRF or risk of eating disorders. Subsequently, linear regression models were fitted according to Baron and Kenny's procedures for mediation analysis. The marginal estimated mean ± SE values of total body bone mineral density for the categories "no risk of eating disorders" and "risk of eating disorders" were 1.239 ± 0.126 < 1.305 ± 0.089, P = 0.021. However, this relationship disappeared after adjustment for any of the parameters of body composition or CRF. Therefore, all body composition parameters (except for lean mass) and CRF turned out to be full mediators in the association between the risk of eating disorders and bone health in young adults. Body composition and CRF mediate the association between the risk of eating disorders and bone health. These findings highlight the importance of maintaining a healthy weight and good CRF for the prevention of the development of eating disorders and for the maintenance of good bone health in young adults. Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 30%
Professor 2 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 3 30%
Psychology 1 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 10%
Sports and Recreations 1 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2019.
All research outputs
#3,852,247
of 14,015,503 outputs
Outputs from Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity
#130
of 588 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,478
of 266,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Eating and Weight Disorders: Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity
#4
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,015,503 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 588 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.