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Craniofacial height in relation to cross-sectional maxillary and mandibular morphology

Overview of attention for article published in Progress in Orthodontics, October 2017
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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34 Mendeley
Title
Craniofacial height in relation to cross-sectional maxillary and mandibular morphology
Published in
Progress in Orthodontics, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40510-017-0187-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Klinge, Karin Becktor, Christina Lindh, Jonas P Becktor

Abstract

In order to gain a better understanding of how growth of the alveolar bone is linked to the vertical development of the face, the purpose of this study was to investigate if there is an association between the cross-sectional morphology of the maxillary and mandibular bodies with the craniofacial height, using images from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). From 450 pre-treatment CBCT scans, 180 were selected to be included in the study. Lateral head images were generated from the CBCT scans and were used to categorise subjects into three groups based on their vertical craniofacial height. Cross-sectional images from CBCT volumes were reformatted of the maxillary and mandibular bodies at five locations in the maxilla and five in the mandible. Each image was measured at one height and two width measurements. Statistical analysis performed was the one-way analysis of variance with a Tukey post hoc test. A significance level of 5% was used in all comparisons. Patients with large vertical craniofacial height had a significantly higher cross-sectional area both in the maxilla and in the mandible. In the same group, the cross-sectional area was significantly thinner in the mandible compared with the other two groups, especially in the anterior region. This study further highlights the close relationship between craniofacial height and alveolar bone dimensions and contributes with important knowledge for planning and follow-up of comprehensive dental- and orthodontic treatments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Other 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 9 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 10 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2017.
All research outputs
#9,255,188
of 12,043,827 outputs
Outputs from Progress in Orthodontics
#112
of 176 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,314
of 284,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Progress in Orthodontics
#5
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,043,827 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 176 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.