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The oncology palliative care clinic at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre: an early intervention model for patients with advanced cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, October 2014
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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53 Mendeley
Title
The oncology palliative care clinic at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre: an early intervention model for patients with advanced cancer
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, October 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2460-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Breffni Hannon, Nadia Swami, Ashley Pope, Gary Rodin, Elizabeth Dougherty, Ernie Mak, Subrata Banerjee, John Bryson, Julia Ridley, Camilla Zimmermann

Abstract

Several recently published randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the benefits of early palliative care involvement for patients with advanced cancer. In the oncology outpatient setting, palliative care clinics are an ideal site for the provision of early, collaborative support, which can be maintained throughout the cancer trajectory. Despite this, access to ambulatory palliative care clinics is limited, even at tertiary cancer centres. Existing programs for outpatient palliative care are variable in scope and are not well described in the literature. We describe the development and expansion of an outpatient palliative care clinic at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada, demonstrating how the clinic functions at a local and regional level. This clinic served as the intervention for a recent large cluster-randomized trial of early palliative care. The model for this service can be adapted by other palliative care programs that aim to provide early, integrated oncology care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 51 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 17%
Researcher 6 11%
Unspecified 6 11%
Other 5 9%
Other 18 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 51%
Unspecified 12 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 11%
Psychology 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2015.
All research outputs
#7,336,263
of 12,219,104 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#1,483
of 2,346 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,446
of 222,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#33
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,219,104 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,346 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 222,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.