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Preventing Weight Gain and Obesity: Indirect Effects of the Family Check-Up in Early Childhood

Overview of attention for article published in Prevention Science, September 2014
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Title
Preventing Weight Gain and Obesity: Indirect Effects of the Family Check-Up in Early Childhood
Published in
Prevention Science, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/s11121-014-0505-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Justin D. Smith, Zorash Montaño, Thomas J. Dishion, Daniel S. Shaw, Melvin N. Wilson

Abstract

The early signs of obesity are observable in early childhood. Although the most promising prevention approaches are family-centered, few relevant early prevention programs exist. This study evaluated the effects of an evidence-based, home-visiting intervention, the Family Check-Up (FCU), on the trajectory of children's weight gain. The FCU was designed to prevent the development of behavior problems by improving family management practices; children's weight has not been an explicit target. On the basis of previous research and conceptual models, we hypothesized that intervention effects on parenting practices, specifically caregivers' use of positive behavior support (PBS) strategies in toddlerhood, would mediate improvements in children's weight trajectories. A total of 731 indigent caregiver-child dyads from a multisite randomized intervention trial were examined. Observational assessment of parenting and mealtime behaviors occurred from age 2-5 years. The child's body mass index (BMI) was assessed yearly from age 5-9.5 years. Path analysis with a latent growth model revealed a significant indirect effect of the FCU on the trajectory of BMI in later childhood. Improvements in caregivers' PBS in toddlerhood, which was related to the nutritional quality of the meals caregivers served to the child during the mealtime task, served as the intervening process. Furthermore, findings indicate that the FCU prevents progression to overweight and obese status amongst at-risk children. These study results add to existing evidence that has demonstrated that family-based interventions aimed at improving general family management skills are effective at preventing weight gain. Future directions are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 88 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 18%
Student > Master 14 16%
Student > Bachelor 13 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Unspecified 10 11%
Other 24 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 24 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 24%
Unspecified 14 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 16%
Social Sciences 8 9%
Other 8 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2014.
All research outputs
#10,938,841
of 12,342,754 outputs
Outputs from Prevention Science
#633
of 658 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#179,193
of 220,139 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Prevention Science
#24
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,342,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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