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Positive Transitions (POST): Evaluation of an HIV Prevention Intervention for HIV-Positive Persons Releasing from Correctional Facilities

Overview of attention for article published in AIDS & Behavior, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Positive Transitions (POST): Evaluation of an HIV Prevention Intervention for HIV-Positive Persons Releasing from Correctional Facilities
Published in
AIDS & Behavior, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10461-014-0879-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robin J. MacGowan, Julie Lifshay, Yuko Mizuno, Wayne D. Johnson, Lyle McCormick, Barry Zack

Abstract

People with HIV who are released from custody frequently do not maintain the viral suppression and other health benefits achieved while incarcerated. This study was conducted to provide preliminary evidence of efficacy of an intervention to reduce HIV risk behaviors and increase use of HIV medical services following release from custody. People with HIV were recruited from San Francisco County jails, San Quentin State Prison and the California Medical Facility (Vacaville, CA), and randomly assigned to the "standard of care" or POST intervention. POST consisted of 4 sessions pre-release and 2 sessions post-release, focusing on HIV prevention and access to care. Behavioral data were obtained for the 3 months before incarceration and 3 months after release. Although POST participants reported a statistically significant increase in receiving health care at HIV clinics (62.5-84.4 %), there were no significant differences between the POST and control participants with respect to any primary outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 23%
Student > Master 8 21%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 10%
Unspecified 4 10%
Other 3 8%
Other 11 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 14 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 21%
Unspecified 7 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 15%
Psychology 2 5%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2014.
All research outputs
#2,278,138
of 4,998,435 outputs
Outputs from AIDS & Behavior
#636
of 1,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,813
of 131,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AIDS & Behavior
#41
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,998,435 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,143 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 131,335 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.