↓ Skip to main content

A hierarchical testing strategy for micropollutants in drinking water regarding their potential endocrine-disrupting effects—towards health-related indicator values

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, September 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
Title
A hierarchical testing strategy for micropollutants in drinking water regarding their potential endocrine-disrupting effects—towards health-related indicator values
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, September 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-0155-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jochen Kuckelkorn, Regine Redelstein, Timon Heide, Jennifer Kunze, Sibylle Maletz, Petra Waldmann, Tamara Grummt, Thomas-Benjamin Seiler, Henner Hollert

Abstract

In Germany, micropollutants that (may) occur in drinking water are assessed by means of the health-related indicator value (HRIV concept), developed by the German Federal Environment Agency. This concept offers five threshold values (≤ 0.01 to ≤ 3 μg l(-1)) depending on availability and completeness of data regarding genotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and germ cell-damaging potential. However, the HRIV concept is yet lacking integration of endocrine disruptors as one of the most prominent toxicological concerns in water bodies, including drinking water. Thresholds and proposed bioassays hence urgently need to be defined. Since endocrine disruption of ubiquitary chemicals as pharmaceuticals, industrial by-products, or pesticides is a big issue in current ecotoxicology, the aim of this study was to explore endocrine effects, i.e., estrogenic and androgenic effects, as an important, additional toxicological mode of action for the HRIV concept using a hierarchical set of well-known but improved bioassays. Results indicate that all of the 13 tested substances, industrial chemicals and combustion products (5), pharmaceuticals and medical agents (4), and pesticides and metabolites (4), have no affinity to the estrogen and androgen receptor in human U2OS cells without metabolic activation, even when dosed at their water solubility limit, while in contrast some of these substances showed estrogenic effects in the RYES assay, as predicted in pre-test QSAR analysis. Using a specifically developed S9-mix with the U2OS cells, those micropollutants, i.e., Benzo[a]pyrene, 2,4-Dichlorophenol, 3,3-Dichlorbenzidin, 3,4-Dichloranilin, and diclofenac, they show estrogenic effects at the same concentration range as for the yeast cells. Three of the drinking water-relevant chemicals, i.e., atrazine, tributyltin oxide, and diclofenac, caused effects on hormone production in the H295R assay, which can be correlated with changes in the expression of steroidogenic genes. One chemical, 17α-Ethinylestradiol, caused an estrogenic or anti-androgenic effect in the reproduction test with Potamopyrgus antipodarum. Considering these results, a proposal for a test strategy for micropollutants in drinking water regarding potential endocrine effects (hormonal effects on reproduction and sexual development) will be presented to enhance the existing HRIV concept.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 29%
Researcher 5 21%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Unspecified 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 6 25%
Unspecified 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Other 5 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2017.
All research outputs
#9,438,714
of 11,812,338 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#1,490
of 3,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#197,100
of 268,863 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#104
of 216 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,812,338 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,028 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,863 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 216 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.