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Education, Other Socioeconomic Characteristics Across the Life Course, and Fertility Among Finnish Men

Overview of attention for article published in European journal of population = Revue Européenne de Démographie, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 201)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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46 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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11 Mendeley
Title
Education, Other Socioeconomic Characteristics Across the Life Course, and Fertility Among Finnish Men
Published in
European journal of population = Revue Européenne de Démographie, July 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10680-017-9430-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica Nisén, Pekka Martikainen, Mikko Myrskylä, Karri Silventoinen

Abstract

The level of education and other adult socioeconomic characteristics of men are known to associate with their fertility, but early-life socioeconomic characteristics may also be related. We studied how men's adult and early-life socioeconomic characteristics are associated with their eventual fertility and whether the differences therein by educational level are explained or mediated by other socioeconomic characteristics. The data on men born in 1940-1950 (N = 37,082) were derived from the 1950 Finnish census, which is linked to later registers. Standard and sibling fixed-effects Poisson and logistic regression models were used. Education and other characteristics were positively associated with the number of children, largely stemming from a higher likelihood of a first birth among the more socioeconomically advantaged men. The educational gradient in the number of children was not explained by early socioeconomic or other characteristics shared by brothers, but occupational position and income in adulthood mediated approximately half of the association. Parity-specific differences existed: education and many other socioeconomic characteristics predicted the likelihood of a first birth more strongly than that of a second birth, and the mediating role of occupational position and income was also strongest for first births. Relatively small differences were found in the likelihood of a third birth. In men, education is positively associated with eventual fertility after controlling for early socioeconomic and other characteristics shared by brothers. Selective entry into fatherhood based on economic provider potential may contribute considerably to educational differentials in the number of children among men.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 36%
Researcher 4 36%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Unspecified 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 3 27%
Unspecified 2 18%
Psychology 2 18%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Other 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2018.
All research outputs
#674,963
of 13,390,206 outputs
Outputs from European journal of population = Revue Européenne de Démographie
#20
of 201 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,525
of 267,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European journal of population = Revue Européenne de Démographie
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,390,206 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 201 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.