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Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder Comprehend Lexicalized and Novel Primary Conceptual Metaphors

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
Title
Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder Comprehend Lexicalized and Novel Primary Conceptual Metaphors
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, May 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10803-014-2129-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric L. Olofson, Drew Casey, Olufemi A. Oluyedun, Jo Van Herwegen, Adam Becerra, Gabriella Rundblad

Abstract

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficulty comprehending metaphors. However, no study to date has examined whether or not they understand conceptual metaphors (i.e. mappings between conceptual structures), which could be the building blocks of metaphoric thinking and understanding. We investigated whether 13 participants with ASD (age 7;03-22;03) and 13 age-matched typically developing (TD) controls could comprehend lexicalized conceptual metaphors (e.g., Susan is a warm person) and novel ones (e.g., Susan is a toasty person). Individuals with ASD performed at greater than chance levels on both metaphor types, although their performance was lower than TD participants. We discuss the theoretical relevance of these findings and educational implications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
Netherlands 1 3%
Unknown 38 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 14 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 40%
Linguistics 6 15%
Unspecified 5 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Computer Science 2 5%
Other 8 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2014.
All research outputs
#1,786,190
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#1,039
of 1,731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,009
of 107,933 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#39
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,731 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 107,933 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.