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Individual variation in thermal performance curves: swimming burst speed and jumping endurance in wild-caught tropical clawed frogs

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, March 2014
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Title
Individual variation in thermal performance curves: swimming burst speed and jumping endurance in wild-caught tropical clawed frogs
Published in
Oecologia, March 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00442-014-2925-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vincent Careau, Peter A. Biro, Camille Bonneaud, Eric B. Fokam, Anthony Herrel

Abstract

The importance of studying individual variation in locomotor performance has long been recognized as it may determine the ability of an organism to escape from predators, catch prey or disperse. In ectotherms, locomotor performance is highly influenced by ambient temperature (T a), yet several studies have showed that individual differences are usually retained across a T a gradient. Less is known, however, about individual differences in thermal sensitivity of performance, despite the fact that it could represent adaptive sources of phenotypic variation and/or additional substrate for selection to act upon. We quantified swimming and jumping performance in 18 wild-caught tropical clawed frogs (Xenopus tropicalis) across a T a gradient. Maximum swimming velocity and acceleration were not repeatable and individuals did not differ in how their swimming performance varied across T a. By contrast, time and distance jumped until exhaustion were repeatable across the T a gradient, indicating that individuals that perform best at a given T a also perform best at another T a. Moreover, thermal sensitivity of jumping endurance significantly differed among individuals, with individuals of high performance at low T a displaying the highest sensitivity to T a. Individual differences in terrestrial performance increased with decreasing T a, which is opposite to results obtained in lizards at the inter-specific and among-individual levels. To verify the generality of these patterns, we need more studies on individual variation in thermal reaction norms for locomotor performance in lizards and frogs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
Puerto Rico 1 1%
Bulgaria 1 1%
Unknown 78 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 20%
Researcher 16 19%
Student > Master 15 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 15 18%
Unknown 7 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 73%
Environmental Science 7 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Sports and Recreations 1 1%
Engineering 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 11 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2014.
All research outputs
#9,766,679
of 12,221,475 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#2,751
of 2,977 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,090
of 197,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#103
of 106 outputs
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