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Acute gastroenteritis in primary care: a longitudinal study in the Swiss Sentinel Surveillance Network, Sentinella

Overview of attention for article published in Infection, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 784)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
Title
Acute gastroenteritis in primary care: a longitudinal study in the Swiss Sentinel Surveillance Network, Sentinella
Published in
Infection, August 2017
DOI 10.1007/s15010-017-1049-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claudia Schmutz, Philipp Justus Bless, Daniel Mäusezahl, Marianne Jost, Mirjam Mäusezahl-Feuz

Abstract

Acute gastroenteritis (AG) leads to considerable burden of disease, health care costs and socio-economic impact worldwide. We assessed the frequency of medical consultations and work absenteeism due to AG at primary care level, and physicians' case management using the Swiss Sentinel Surveillance Network "Sentinella". During the 1-year, longitudinal study in 2014, 172 physicians participating in "Sentinella" reported consultations due to AG including information on clinical presentation, stool diagnostics, treatment, and work absenteeism. An incidence of 2146 first consultations due to AG at primary care level per 100,000 inhabitants in Switzerland was calculated for 2014 based on reported 3.9 thousand cases. Physicians classified patients' general condition at first consultation with a median score of 7 (1 = poor, 10 = good). The majority (92%) of patients received dietary recommendations and/or medical prescriptions; antibiotics were prescribed in 8.5%. Stool testing was initiated in 12.3% of cases; more frequently in patients reporting recent travel. Among employees (15-64 years), 86.3% were on sick leave. Median duration of sick leave was 4 days. The burden of AG in primary care is high and comparable with that of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Switzerland. Work absenteeism is substantial, leading to considerable socio-economic impact. Mandatory infectious disease surveillance underestimates the burden of AG considering that stool testing is not conducted routinely. While a national strategy to reduce the burden of ILI exists, similar comprehensive prevention efforts should be considered for AG.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 24%
Researcher 5 20%
Unspecified 4 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 6 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 40%
Unspecified 6 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 5 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2017.
All research outputs
#519,677
of 11,580,830 outputs
Outputs from Infection
#8
of 784 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,223
of 265,873 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infection
#2
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,580,830 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 784 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,873 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.