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Digital health behaviour change interventions targeting physical activity and diet in cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cancer Survivorship, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 616)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
82 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
193 Mendeley
Title
Digital health behaviour change interventions targeting physical activity and diet in cancer survivors: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Published in
Journal of Cancer Survivorship, August 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11764-017-0632-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna L. Roberts, Abigail Fisher, Lee Smith, Malgorzata Heinrich, Henry W. W. Potts

Abstract

The number of cancer survivors has risen substantially due to improvements in early diagnosis and treatment. Health behaviours such as physical activity (PA) and diet can reduce recurrence and mortality, and alleviate negative consequences of cancer and treatments. Digital behaviour change interventions (DBCIs) have the potential to reach large numbers of cancer survivors. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses of relevant studies identified by a search of Medline, EMBASE, PubMed and CINAHL. Studies which assessed a DBCI with measures of PA, diet and/or sedentary behaviour were included. Fifteen studies were identified. Random effects meta-analyses showed significant improvements in moderate-vigorous PA (seven studies; mean difference (MD) = 41 min per week; 95% CI 12, 71) and body mass index (BMI)/weight (standardised mean difference (SMD) = -0.23; 95% CI -0.41, -0.05). There was a trend towards significance for reduced fatigue and no significant change in cancer-specific measures of quality of life (QoL). Narrative synthesis revealed mixed evidence for effects on diet, generic QoL measures and self-efficacy and no evidence of an effect on mental health. Two studies suggested improved sleep quality. DBCIs may improve PA and BMI among cancer survivors, and there is mixed evidence for diet. The number of included studies is small, and risk of bias and heterogeneity was high. Future research should address these limitations with large, high-quality RCTs, with objective measures of PA and sedentary time. Digital technologies offer a promising approach to encourage health behaviour change among cancer survivors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 82 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 193 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 193 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 34 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 16%
Researcher 27 14%
Student > Bachelor 26 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 5%
Other 38 20%
Unknown 28 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 19%
Psychology 30 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 14%
Sports and Recreations 14 7%
Social Sciences 11 6%
Other 30 16%
Unknown 44 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 60. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2020.
All research outputs
#363,268
of 15,482,859 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cancer Survivorship
#16
of 616 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,426
of 271,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cancer Survivorship
#2
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,482,859 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 616 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,807 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.