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Reconstructed historical distribution and phylogeography unravels non-steppic origin of Caucasotachea vindobonensis (Gastropoda: Helicidae)

Overview of attention for article published in Organisms Diversity & Evolution, July 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
Title
Reconstructed historical distribution and phylogeography unravels non-steppic origin of Caucasotachea vindobonensis (Gastropoda: Helicidae)
Published in
Organisms Diversity & Evolution, July 2017
DOI 10.1007/s13127-017-0337-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Łukasz Kajtoch, Angus Davison, Adele Grindon, Tamás Deli, Gábor Sramkó, Mariusz Gwardjan, Sergei Kramarenko, Dominika Mierzwa-Szymkowiak, Rafał Ruta, Radosław Ścibior, János Pál Tóth, Chris Wade, Michał Kolasa, Roman V. Egorov, Zoltán Fehér

Abstract

Existing data on the phylogeography of European taxa of steppic provenance suggests that species were widely distributed during glacial periods but underwent range contraction and fragmentation during interglacials into "warm-stage refugia." Among the steppe-related invertebrates that have been examined, the majority has been insects, but data on the phylogeography of snails is wholly missing. To begin to fill this gap, phylogeographic and niche modeling studies on the presumed steppic snail Caucasotachea vindobonensis were conducted. Surprisingly, reconstruction of ancestral areas suggests that extant C. vindobonensis probably originated in the Balkans and survived there during the Late Pleistocene glaciations, with a more recent colonization of the Carpatho-Pannonian and the Ponto-Caspian regions. In the Holocene, C. vindobonensis colonized between the Sudetes and the Carpathians to the north, where its recent and current distribution may have been facilitated by anthropogenic translocations. Together, these data suggest a possible non-steppic origin of C. vindobonensis. Further investigation may reveal the extent to which the steppic snail assemblages consist partly of Holocene newcomers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 20%
Researcher 2 20%
Unspecified 2 20%
Student > Master 1 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Unknown 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 50%
Unspecified 2 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 20%
Unknown 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2019.
All research outputs
#3,358,476
of 13,444,619 outputs
Outputs from Organisms Diversity & Evolution
#61
of 268 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,692
of 266,323 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Organisms Diversity & Evolution
#3
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,444,619 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 268 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,323 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.