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Does Transinstitutionalization Explain the Overrepresentation of People with Serious Mental Illnesses in the Criminal Justice System?

Overview of attention for article published in Community Mental Health Journal, June 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
Title
Does Transinstitutionalization Explain the Overrepresentation of People with Serious Mental Illnesses in the Criminal Justice System?
Published in
Community Mental Health Journal, June 2011
DOI 10.1007/s10597-011-9420-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seth J. Prins

Abstract

Although there is broad consensus that people with serious mental illnesses (SMI) are overrepresented in correctional settings, there is less agreement about the policy trends that may have created this situation. Some researchers and policymakers posit a direct link between deinstitutionalization and increased rates of SMI in jails and prisons, a phenomenon described as transinstitutionalization. Others offer evidence that challenges this hypothesis and suggest that it may be a reductionist explanation. This paper reviews claims from both sides of the debate, and concludes that merely increasing access to state psychiatric hospital beds would likely not reduce the number of people with SMI in jails and prisons. A more nuanced approach is recommended for explaining why people with SMI become involved in the criminal justice system and why developing effective strategies to divert them out of jails and prisons and into community-based treatment is needed to improve both their mental health and criminal justice outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Unknown 68 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 26%
Student > Bachelor 14 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 13%
Researcher 8 11%
Unspecified 6 9%
Other 15 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 27 39%
Psychology 13 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 13%
Unspecified 7 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Other 7 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2019.
All research outputs
#1,988,802
of 13,825,270 outputs
Outputs from Community Mental Health Journal
#66
of 914 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,819
of 190,814 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Community Mental Health Journal
#1
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,825,270 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 914 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,814 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.