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Leukemia risk in children exposed to benzene and PM10 from vehicular traffic: a case–control study in an Italian population

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Epidemiology, August 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
Title
Leukemia risk in children exposed to benzene and PM10 from vehicular traffic: a case–control study in an Italian population
Published in
European Journal of Epidemiology, August 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10654-012-9727-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marco Vinceti, Kenneth J. Rothman, Catherine M. Crespi, Antonella Sterni, Andrea Cherubini, Luisa Guerra, Giuseppe Maffeis, Enrica Ferretti, Sara Fabbi, Sergio Teggi, Dario Consonni, Gianfranco De Girolamo, Alessandro Meggiato, Giovanni Palazzi, Paolo Paolucci, Carlotta Malagoli

Abstract

Benzene, a recognized occupational leukemogen in adults, has been hypothesized to also increase the risk of childhood leukemia. We carried out a population-based case-control study in a northern Italy community involving 83 cases with acute childhood leukemia diagnosed in the years 1998-2009 and 332 matched controls. We assessed residential exposure to benzene and to particulate matter ≤10 μm (PM10) from motorized traffic using geocoded residences and detailed emission and dispersion modeling. Exposure to benzene, and to a lesser extent to PM10, appeared to be independently associated with an excess leukemia risk. When we stratified the study population by age and by leukemia subtype, the relative risk associated with benzene exposure was higher among children aged less than 5 years, and despite small numbers this relation appeared to be considerably stronger for acute myeloid leukemia than for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Overall, these findings suggest that exposure to low levels of benzene released from motorized traffic may increase the risk of childhood leukemia, and suggest a possible independent effect of PM10, although unmeasured confounding due to other pollutants cannot be ruled out.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Switzerland 1 2%
India 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 55 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 33%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 7%
Other 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 28%
Environmental Science 15 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 13%
Unspecified 7 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Other 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2015.
All research outputs
#1,528,827
of 7,430,338 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Epidemiology
#190
of 667 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,417
of 173,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Epidemiology
#10
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,430,338 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 667 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 173,876 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.