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A nonpathogenic duck-origin H9N2 influenza A virus adapts to high pathogenicity in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Virology, April 2014
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2 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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14 Mendeley
Title
A nonpathogenic duck-origin H9N2 influenza A virus adapts to high pathogenicity in mice
Published in
Archives of Virology, April 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00705-014-2062-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qingtao Liu, Hongzhi Chen, Junqing Huang, Yuxin Chen, Min Gu, Xiaoquan Wang, Shunlin Hu, Xiaowen Liu, Xiufan Liu

Abstract

H9N2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in wild birds and poultry in Eurasian countries and have repeatedly infected mammals, including pigs and humans, posing a significant threat to public health. To understand the adaptation of H9N2 influenza viruses to mammals, we serially passaged a nonpathogenic duck-origin H9N2 influenza virus, A/duck/Jiangsu/1/2008 (DK1), in mouse lungs. Increased virulence was detectable after five sequential passages, and a highly pathogenic mouse-adapted strain (DK1-MA) with a 50 % mouse lethal dose of 10(2.37) 50 % egg infectious dose was obtained after 18 passages. DK1-MA grew faster and reached significantly higher titers than DK1 in mouse lungs and could sporadically spread to other organs. Moreover, DK1-MA induced a greater magnitude of pulmonary edema and higher levels of inflammatory cellular infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids than DK1 did. Genomic sequence alignment revealed eight amino acid substitutions (HA-L80F, HA-N193D, NA-A27T, PB2-F404L, PA-D3V, PA-S225R, NP-V105M, M1-A166V) in six viral proteins of DK1-MA compared with DK1 virus. Except for HA-L80F, the other seven substitutions were all located in known functional regions involved in interaction of viral proteins or interaction between the virus and host factors. Taken together, our results suggest that multiple amino acid substitutions may be involved in the adaptation of H9N2 avian influenza virus to mice, resulting in lethal infection, enhanced viral replication, severe pulmonary edema, and excessive inflammatory cellular infiltration in lungs. These observations provide helpful insights into the pathogenic potential of H9N2 avian influenza viruses that could pose threats to human health in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Professor 2 14%
Researcher 2 14%
Unspecified 2 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 36%
Unspecified 3 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 14%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Other 2 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2014.
All research outputs
#9,377,687
of 12,222,476 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Virology
#1,922
of 2,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,419
of 199,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Virology
#18
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,222,476 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,846 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,172 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.