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Hyperinsulinaemia as a predictor of coronary heart disease mortality in a healthy population: the Paris Prospective Study, 15-year follow-up

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetologia, May 1991
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

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1 policy source
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1 tweeter

Citations

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305 Dimensions

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28 Mendeley
Title
Hyperinsulinaemia as a predictor of coronary heart disease mortality in a healthy population: the Paris Prospective Study, 15-year follow-up
Published in
Diabetologia, May 1991
DOI 10.1007/bf00405009
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Fontbonne, M. A. Charles, N. Thibult, J. L. Richard, J. R. Claude, J. M. Warnet, G. E. Rosselin, E. Eschw�ge

Abstract

The Paris Prospective Study is a long-term, large-scale study of the factors predicting coronary heart disease. The first follow-up examination included, for subjects not known as having diabetes mellitus, a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test with measurement of plasma insulin and glucose levels, fasting and 2 h post-load. Between 1968 and 1973, 6903 men aged 43-54 years were thus examined. Causes of death were ascertained within this group after 15 years of mean follow-up. The baseline variables were tested as predictors of death from coronary heart disease by a Cox regression analysis. Significant independent predictors of coronary heart disease death were: systolic blood pressure, number of cigarettes per day, plasma cholesterol level, and 2 h post-load plasma insulin level when entered as a categorical variable (below or above 452 pmol/l. i.e. the lower limit of the fifth quintile of the distribution). This dichotomization was performed to account for the non-linear univariate distribution of deaths with increasing post-load insulin values. Fasting plasma insulin level was not an independent predictor of death by coronary heart disease over this long-term follow-up. Levels of blood glucose were not significant independent predictors of death by coronary heart disease when plasma insulin levels were included in the model. The same applied to abnormalities of glucose tolerance when the 125 men with known non-insulin-treated diabetes at baseline were added to the group. Under the assumption that hyperinsulinaemia is a marker of insulin resistance, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that insulin resistance is associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease mortality. However, it is doubtful that circulating insulin per se is a direct cause of arterial complications.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 18%
Unspecified 4 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Researcher 3 11%
Other 8 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 21%
Unspecified 5 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2019.
All research outputs
#4,003,878
of 13,770,158 outputs
Outputs from Diabetologia
#1,776
of 3,908 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,390
of 266,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetologia
#63
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,770,158 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,908 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.