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Olfactory bulb involvement in neurodegenerative diseases

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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138 Mendeley
Title
Olfactory bulb involvement in neurodegenerative diseases
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica, February 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00401-014-1261-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Johannes Attems, Lauren Walker, Kurt A. Jellinger

Abstract

Olfactory dysfunction is a common and early symptom of many neurodegenerative diseases, particularly of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment heralding its progression to dementia. The neuropathologic changes of olfactory dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases may involve the olfactory epithelium, olfactory bulb/tract, primary olfactory cortices, and their secondary targets. Olfactory dysfunction is related to deposition of pathological proteins, α-synuclein, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and neurofilament protein in these areas, featured by neurofibrillary tangles, Lewy bodies and neurites inducing a complex cascade of molecular processes including oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and cytosolic disruption of cellular processes leading to cell death. Damage to cholinergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic systems is likely involved, since such damage is most marked in those diseases with severe anosmia. Recent studies of olfactory dysfunction have focused its potential as an early biomarker for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders and their disease progression. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on neuropathological and pathophysiological changes of the olfactory system in the most frequent neurodegenerative diseases, in particular AD and synucleinopathies. We also present neuropathological findings in the olfactory bulb and tract in a large autopsy cohort (n = 536, 57.8 % female, mean age 81.3 years). The severity of olfactory bulb HPτ, Aβ, and αSyn pathology correlated and increased significantly (P < 0.001) with increasing neuritic Braak stages, Thal Aβ phases, and cerebral Lewy body pathology, respectively. Hence, further studies are warranted to investigate the potential role of olfactory biopsies (possibly restricted to the olfactory epithelium) in the diagnostic process of neurodegenerative diseases in particular in clinical drug trials to identify subjects showing early, preclinical stages of neurodegeneration and to stratify clinically impaired cohorts according to the underlying cerebral neuropathology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Brazil 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Unknown 132 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 25%
Student > Bachelor 25 18%
Student > Master 21 15%
Researcher 18 13%
Unspecified 9 7%
Other 31 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 30%
Neuroscience 25 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 14%
Unspecified 18 13%
Psychology 17 12%
Other 18 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2014.
All research outputs
#7,622,923
of 13,232,536 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica
#1,344
of 1,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,331
of 188,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica
#15
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,232,536 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,089 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.