↓ Skip to main content

Epidemiology of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in an intensive care unit with no single rooms

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, July 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
Title
Epidemiology of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in an intensive care unit with no single rooms
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13613-017-0295-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Repessé, Xavier, Artiguenave, Margaux, Paktoris-Papine, Sophie, Espinasse, Florence, Dinh, Aurélien, Charron, Cyril, El Sayed, Faten, Geri, Guillaume, Vieillard-Baron, Antoine, Xavier Repessé, Margaux Artiguenave, Sophie Paktoris-Papine, Florence Espinasse, Aurélien Dinh, Cyril Charron, Faten El Sayed, Guillaume Geri, Antoine Vieillard-Baron

Abstract

The transmission of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing enterobacteriaceae (ESBL) is prevented by additional contact precautions, mainly relying on isolation in a single room and hand hygiene. Contact isolation cannot be achieved in our 12-bed ICU, which has only double rooms. We report the epidemiology of ESBL imported, acquired and transmitted in an ICU with no single rooms. We prospectively conducted an observational and non-interventional study in a French 12-bed ICU. Inclusion criteria were patients >18 years of age treated by at least two successive nursing teams. Patient characteristics at admission and clinical data during hospital stay were collected prospectively. ESBL carriage was monitored using rectal swabs collected at admission and once weekly during the ICU stay. Potential cross-transmission was studied (1) by identifying index patients defined as possible ESBL sources for transmission, (2) by classifying each ESBL strain according to the cefotaximase München (CTXM) 1 and 9 groups and (3) by gene sequencing for remaining cases of possible transmission. From June 2014 to April 2015, of 550 patients admitted to the ICU, 470 met the inclusion criteria and 221 had at least two rectal swabs. The rate of ESBL colonization, mainly by Escherichia coli, at admission was 13.2%. The incidence of ESBL acquisition, mainly with E. coli too, was 4.1%. Mortality did not differ between ESBL carriers and non-carriers. In univariate analysis, ESBL acquisition was associated with male gender, SAPS II, SOFA, chronic kidney disease at admission, duration of mechanical ventilation, need for catecholamine and the ICU LOS. In multivariate analysis, SAPS II at admission was the only risk factor for ESBL acquisition. We confirmed cross-transmission, emanating from the same index patient, in two of the nine patients with ESBL acquisition (0.8%, 2/221). No case of cross-transmission in the same double room was observed. Prevalence of ESBL colonization in our ICU was 13.2%. Despite the absence single rooms, the incidence of ESBL acquisition was 4.1% and cross-transmission was proven in only two cases, resulting from the same index patient who was not hospitalized in the same double room.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 12%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 27%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 16 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,146,079
of 11,435,137 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#405
of 447 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,945
of 259,700 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#17
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,435,137 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 447 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,700 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.