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Factors which modulate the rates of skeletal muscle mass loss in non-small cell lung cancer patients: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, June 2017
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Title
Factors which modulate the rates of skeletal muscle mass loss in non-small cell lung cancer patients: a pilot study
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, June 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3755-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philippe Atlan, Mohamed Amine Bayar, Emilie Lanoy, Benjamin Besse, David Planchard, Jordy Ramon, Bruno Raynard, Sami Antoun

Abstract

Advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with weight loss which may reflect skeletal muscle mass (SMM) and/or total adipose tissue (TAT) depletion. This study aimed to describe changes in body composition (BC) parameters and to identify the factors unrelated to the tumor which modulate them. SMM, TAT, and the proportion of SMM to SMM + TAT were assessed with computed tomography. Estimates of each BC parameter at follow-up initiation and across time were derived from a mixed linear model of repeated measurements with a random intercept and a random slope. The same models were used to assess the independent effect of gender, age, body mass index (BMI), and initial values on changes in each BC parameter. Sixty-four patients with stage III or IV NSCLC were reviewed. The mean ± SD decreases in body weight and SMM were respectively 59 ± 3 g/week (P < 0.03) and 7 mm(2)/m(2)/week (P = 0.0003). During follow-up, no changes were identified in TAT nor in muscle density or in the proportion of SMM to SMM + TAT, estimated at 37 ± 2% at baseline. SMM loss was influenced by initial BMI (P < 0.0001) and SMM values (P = 0.0002): the higher the initial BMI or SMM values, the greater the loss observed. Weight loss was greater when the initial weight was heavier (P < 0.0001). Our results demonstrate that SMM wasting in NSCLC is lower when initial SMM and BMI values are low. These exploratory findings after our attempt to better understand the intrinsic factors associated with muscle mass depletion need to be confirmed in larger studies.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 24%
Librarian 4 16%
Professor 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 48%
Unspecified 8 32%
Sports and Recreations 2 8%
Energy 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,063,228
of 11,346,659 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#1,892
of 2,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,144
of 267,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#64
of 79 outputs
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