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Role of Rhizophagus irregularis in alleviating cadmium toxicity via improving the growth, micro- and macroelements uptake in Phragmites australis

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, November 2016
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Title
Role of Rhizophagus irregularis in alleviating cadmium toxicity via improving the growth, micro- and macroelements uptake in Phragmites australis
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-7984-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Li Wang, Xiaochen Huang, Fang Ma, Shih-Hsin Ho, Jieting Wu, Shishu Zhu

Abstract

Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been used to alleviate heavy metal stress on plant growth and uptake of micro- and macroelements. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to verify the effects of AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on the growth, physiological characteristics, total Cd, and element uptake of Phragmites australis under different Cd stress (in the range of 0-20 mg L(-1)). The results showed that the symbiosis could effectively alleviate Cd toxicity with greater root biomass, higher photosynthesis rate, and lower levels of malonaldehyde (MDA) and proline than non-mycorrhizal plants could. However, reduced transpiration rate (Tr) and stomatal conductance (g s) indicated R. irregularis protected host plants from Cd stress (≥5 mg L(-1)) via the stomatal closure. Although micro- and macroelements displayed differently in the presence of Cd, higher concentrations were still detected in mycorrhizal plants in contrast to non-mycorrhizal plants. Moreover, step multiple regression significantly demonstrated Pnmax, stem diameter (Sd), and g s were the important factors with regard to total Cd uptake in the symbiosis, but Mn affected to non-mycorrhizal plants. These results suggested R. irregularis could alleviate the competition between Mn and Cd by altering plant physiology. This work clearly demonstrated that R. irregularis can be able to support P. australis growth better even though under high Cd stress (>1 mg L(-1)), suggesting its good potential for practical use in high Cd-contaminated areas.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 33%
Unspecified 5 28%
Student > Master 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 39%
Unspecified 6 33%
Environmental Science 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,057,435
of 11,340,430 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#1,865
of 2,862 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,960
of 267,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#108
of 181 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 181 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.