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A pilot study of minocycline for the prevention of paclitaxel-associated neuropathy: ACCRU study RU221408I

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, May 2017
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Title
A pilot study of minocycline for the prevention of paclitaxel-associated neuropathy: ACCRU study RU221408I
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, May 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3760-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deirdre R. Pachman, Travis Dockter, Patricia J. Zekan, Briant Fruth, Kathryn J. Ruddy, Lauren E. Ta, Jacqueline M. Lafky, Todor Dentchev, Nguyet Anh Le-Lindqwister, William M. Sikov, Nathan Staff, Andreas S. Beutler, Charles L. Loprinzi

Abstract

Paclitaxel is associated with both an acute pain syndrome (P-APS) and chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Given that extensive animal data suggest that minocycline may prevent chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity, the purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the efficacy of minocycline for the prevention of CIPN and the P-APS. Patients with breast cancer were enrolled prior to initiating neoadjuvant or adjuvant weekly paclitaxel for 12 weeks and were randomized to receive minocycline 200 mg on day 1 followed by 100 mg twice daily or a matching placebo. Patients completed (1) an acute pain syndrome questionnaire daily during chemotherapy to measure P-APS and (2) the EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 questionnaire at baseline, prior to each dose of paclitaxel, and monthly for 6 months post treatment, to measure CIPN. Forty-seven patients were randomized. There were no remarkable differences noted between the minocycline and placebo groups for the overall sensory neuropathy score of the EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 or its individual components, which evaluate tingling, numbness and shooting/burning pain in hands and feet. However, patients taking minocycline had a significant reduction in the daily average pain score attributed to P-APS (p = 0.02). Not only were no increased toxicities reported with minocycline, but there was a significant reduction in fatigue (p = 0.02). Results of this pilot study do not support the use of minocycline to prevent CIPN, but suggest that it may reduce P-APS and decrease fatigue; further study of the impact of this agent on those endpoints may be warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 23%
Researcher 5 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 7 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 10 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Neuroscience 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2017.
All research outputs
#10,305,831
of 11,618,793 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#1,965
of 2,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#226,407
of 269,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#61
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,618,793 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,225 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.