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High Prevalence of Chronic Non-Communicable Conditions Among Adult Refugees: Implications for Practice and Policy

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Community Health, March 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
130 Mendeley
Title
High Prevalence of Chronic Non-Communicable Conditions Among Adult Refugees: Implications for Practice and Policy
Published in
Journal of Community Health, March 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10900-012-9552-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine Yun, Kelly Hebrank, Lauren K. Graber, Mary-Christine Sullivan, Isabel Chen, Jhumka Gupta

Abstract

The global rise in non-communicable disease (NCD) suggests that US-based refugees are increasingly affected by chronic conditions. However, health services have focused on the detection of infectious disease, with relatively limited data on chronic NCDs. Using data from a retrospective medical record review of a refugee health program in the urban Northeast (n = 180), we examined the prevalence of chronic NCDs and NCD risk factors among adult refugees who had recently arrived in the US, with attention to region of origin and family composition. Family composition was included because low-income adults without dependent children are at high risk of becoming uninsured. We found that half of the adult refugees in this sample had at least one chronic NCD (51.1%), and 9.5% had three or more NCDs. Behavioral health diagnoses were most common (15.0%), followed by hypertension (13.3%). Half of adults were overweight or obese (54.6%). Chronic NCDs were somewhat more common among adults from Iraq, but this difference was not significant (56.8 vs. 44.6%). Chronic NCDs were common among adults with and without dependent children (61.4 vs. 44.6%, respectively), and these two groups did not significantly differ in their likelihood of having a chronic NCD after adjustment for age and gender (AOR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.39, 1.55). This study suggests that chronic NCDs are common among adult refugees in the US, including refugees at high risk for uninsurance. We propose that refugee health services accommodate screening and treatment for chronic NCDs and NCD risk factors, and that insurance outreach and enrollment programs target recently arrived refugees.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 130 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Cameroon 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 126 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 13%
Researcher 15 12%
Student > Postgraduate 14 11%
Other 33 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 38%
Social Sciences 25 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 8%
Unspecified 10 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Other 26 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,939,296
of 12,799,521 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Community Health
#124
of 784 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,461
of 239,814 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Community Health
#5
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,799,521 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 784 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,814 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.