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Insights into Nano- and Micron-Scale Phase Separation in Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Fluorescence-Based Techniques in Combination with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Overview of attention for article published in Pharmaceutical Research, April 2017
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1 tweeter

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
Title
Insights into Nano- and Micron-Scale Phase Separation in Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Fluorescence-Based Techniques in Combination with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Published in
Pharmaceutical Research, April 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11095-017-2145-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hitesh S. Purohit, James D. Ormes, Sugandha Saboo, Yongchao Su, Matthew S. Lamm, Amanda K. P. Mann, Lynne S. Taylor

Abstract

Miscibility between the drug and the polymer in an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) is considered to be one of the most important factors impacting the solid state stability and dissolution performance of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). The research described herein utilizes emerging fluorescence-based methodologies to probe (im)miscibility of itraconazole (ITZ)-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) ASDs. The ASDs were prepared by solvent evaporation with varying evaporation rates and were characterized by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal imaging, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy. The size of the phase separated domains for the ITZ-HPMC ASDs was affected by the solvent evaporation rate. Smaller domains (<10 nm) were observed in spray-dried ASDs, whereas larger domains (>30 nm) were found in ASDs prepared using slower evaporation rates. Confocal imaging provided visual confirmation of phase separation along with chemical specificity, achieved by selectively staining drug-rich and polymer-rich phases. ssNMR confirmed the results of fluorescence-based techniques and provided information on the size of phase separated domains. The fluorescence-based methodologies proved to be sensitive and rapid in detecting phase separation, even at the nanoscale, in the ITZ-HPMC ASDs. Fluorescence-based methods thus show promise for miscibility evaluation of spray-dried ASDs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 29%
Researcher 6 25%
Student > Master 3 13%
Unspecified 3 13%
Other 2 8%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 42%
Chemistry 7 29%
Unspecified 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Chemical Engineering 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2017.
All research outputs
#6,651,639
of 10,924,857 outputs
Outputs from Pharmaceutical Research
#1,216
of 1,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,266
of 264,347 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pharmaceutical Research
#7
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,924,857 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,614 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,347 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.