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Affective concordance in couples: a cross-sectional analysis of depression and anxiety consultations within a population of 13,507 couples in primary care

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

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5 tweeters
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Citations

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2 Dimensions

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30 Mendeley
Title
Affective concordance in couples: a cross-sectional analysis of depression and anxiety consultations within a population of 13,507 couples in primary care
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1354-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Walker, J. Liddle, K. P. Jordan, P. Campbell

Abstract

Depression and anxiety are common and have a significant impact on the individual and wider society. One theory proposed to explain a heightened risk for depression and anxiety is affective concordance in couples (e.g. influence of shared mood states, shared health beliefs). Whilst research has shown concordance for severe psychiatric illnesses and general mood in couples, little attention has been given to concordance for common psychiatric conditions such as depression and anxiety. The aims of this study were to test affective concordance in couples and examine potential influences on concordance. Study design is a 1-year cross-sectional study of anxiety and depression consultations in primary care. Data were obtained from a validated primary care database of recorded consultations. Outcome was the presence of an anxiety or depression Read Code (GP recorded reason for consultation) in the female (within the couple dyad), and exposure was a recorded Read Code of anxiety or depression in the male. Logistic regression was used to test associations with odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) reported. Statistical adjustment was carried out on potential influences of concordance; age, environment (deprivation), healthcare behaviour (consultation frequency), and comorbidity. A population of 13,507 couples were identified in which 927 people consulted for anxiety and 538 for depression. Logistic regression showed a 3 times increase in odds of an anxiety consultation in females if their male partner had also consulted OR 2.98 (95% CI 2.15 to 4.13). For depression females were over 4 times the odds of consulting if their male partner had also consulted OR 4.45 (95% CI 2.79 to 7.09). Adjustment within a multivariable model showed some reduction in odds; concordant anxiety was reduced to 2.5 times odds OR 2.48 (95%CI 1.76 to 3.50) and depression reduced to OR 3.39 (2.07 to 5.54). Results show significant associations for affective concordance in couples. Factors influencing concordance are comorbidity and environmental factors, however reasons for deciding to consult (positive or negative) are unknown. This study highlights the patients' social context as a factor in consultations for anxiety and depression and gives support to the consideration of the patient's household as an influence on mental health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 10 33%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 20%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 40%
Psychology 8 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Computer Science 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2017.
All research outputs
#3,331,879
of 12,091,568 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,269
of 2,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,188
of 268,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#39
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,568 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,794 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,980 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.