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Acquired equivalence and generalized suppression in a virtual reality environment

Overview of attention for article published in Learning & Behavior, December 2013
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2 tweeters

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12 Mendeley
Title
Acquired equivalence and generalized suppression in a virtual reality environment
Published in
Learning & Behavior, December 2013
DOI 10.3758/s13420-013-0129-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

W. James Greville, Simon Dymond, Philip M. Newton, Bryan Roche

Abstract

Acquired equivalence was investigated using a virtual reality conditioned suppression task administered in a first-person-shooter game. Two visual cues, A1 and B1, were followed by a tone (O1), and another two cues, A2 and B2, were followed by another tone (O2). During differential Pavlovian conditioning, A1 was paired with an instructed unconditioned stimulus (US) consisting of a flashing white screen, whereas A2 was not. All cues and outcomes were then presented at test, in the absence of the US, and suppression ratios were calculated for multiple response topographies (shots, hits, and breaks). Clear evidence of the suppression of shots was seen for A1 and B1, with no suppression being seen for either A2 or B2. Presentations of O1 and O2 resulted in significant suppression of shots and hits, whereas only O1 led to the suppression of breaks. The US expectancy ratings were consistent with these behavioral results. The findings are discussed in the light of differing accounts of acquired equivalence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 8%
Sweden 1 8%
Unknown 10 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 25%
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Lecturer 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 10 83%
Unspecified 1 8%
Design 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2014.
All research outputs
#8,177,651
of 13,045,101 outputs
Outputs from Learning & Behavior
#163
of 363 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,693
of 249,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Learning & Behavior
#5
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,045,101 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 363 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,011 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.