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Assessing Gaps and Poverty-Related Inequalities in the Public and Private Sector Family Planning Supply Environment of Urban Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Urban Health, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
Title
Assessing Gaps and Poverty-Related Inequalities in the Public and Private Sector Family Planning Supply Environment of Urban Nigeria
Published in
Journal of Urban Health, November 2013
DOI 10.1007/s11524-013-9841-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica K. Levy, Sian Curtis, Catherine Zimmer, Ilene S. Speizer

Abstract

Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa, and its population is expected to double in <25 years (Central Intelligence Agency 2012; Fotso et al. 2011). Over half of the population already lives in an urban area, and by 2050, that proportion will increase to three quarters (United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division 2012; Measurement Learning & Evaluation Project, Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative, National Population Commission 2012). Reducing unwanted and unplanned pregnancies through reliable access to high-quality modern contraceptives, especially among the urban poor, could make a major contribution to moderating population growth and improving the livelihood of urban residents. This study uses facility census data to create and assign aggregate-level family planning (FP) supply index scores to 19 local government areas (LGAs) across six selected cities of Nigeria. It then explores the relationships between public and private sector FP services and determines whether contraceptive access and availability in either sector is correlated with community-level wealth. Data show pronounced variability in contraceptive access and availability across LGAs in both sectors, with a positive correlation between public sector and private sector supply environments and only localized associations between the FP supply environments and poverty. These results will be useful for program planners and policy makers to improve equal access to contraception through the expansion or redistribution of services in focused urban areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Kenya 1 2%
Nigeria 1 2%
Unknown 53 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 30%
Researcher 13 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 15 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 14%
Engineering 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2015.
All research outputs
#3,360,778
of 12,497,322 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Urban Health
#407
of 931 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,292
of 234,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Urban Health
#8
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,497,322 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 931 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,947 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.