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Molecular detection of viruses in Kenyan bats and discovery of novel astroviruses, caliciviruses and rotaviruses

Overview of attention for article published in Virologica Sinica, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
Title
Molecular detection of viruses in Kenyan bats and discovery of novel astroviruses, caliciviruses and rotaviruses
Published in
Virologica Sinica, April 2017
DOI 10.1007/s12250-016-3930-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cecilia Waruhiu, Sheila Ommeh, Vincent Obanda, Bernard Agwanda, Francis Gakuya, Xing-Yi Ge, Xing-Lou Yang, Li-Jun Wu, Ali Zohaib, Ben Hu, Zheng-Li Shi

Abstract

This is the first country-wide surveillance of bat-borne viruses in Kenya spanning from 2012-2015 covering sites perceived to have medium to high level bat-human interaction. The objective of this surveillance study was to apply a non-invasive approach using fresh feces to detect viruses circulating within the diverse species of Kenyan bats. We screened for both DNA and RNA viruses; specifically, astroviruses (AstVs), adenoviruses (ADVs), caliciviruses (CalVs), coronaviruses (CoVs), flaviviruses, filoviruses, paramyxoviruses (PMVs), polyomaviruses (PYVs) and rotaviruses. We used family-specific primers, amplicon sequencing and further characterization by phylogenetic analysis. Except for filoviruses, eight virus families were detected with varying distributions and positive rates across the five regions (former provinces) studied. AstVs (12.83%), CoVs (3.97%), PMV (2.4%), ADV (2.26%), PYV (1.65%), CalVs (0.29%), rotavirus (0.19%) and flavivirus (0.19%). Novel CalVs were detected in Rousettus aegyptiacus and Mops condylurus while novel Rotavirus-A-related viruses were detected in Taphozous bats and R. aegyptiacus. The two Rotavirus A (RVA) strains detected were highly related to human strains with VP6 genotypes I2 and I16. Genotype I16 has previously been assigned to human RVA-strain B10 from Kenya only, which raises public health concern, particularly considering increased human-bat interaction. Additionally, 229E-like bat CoVs were detected in samples originating from Hipposideros bats roosting in sites with high human activity. Our findings confirm the presence of diverse viruses in Kenyan bats while providing extended knowledge on bat virus distribution. The detection of viruses highly related to human strains and hence of public health concern, underscores the importance of continuous surveillance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 36%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 21%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 8%
Computer Science 3 8%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 9 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,129,156
of 9,679,413 outputs
Outputs from Virologica Sinica
#68
of 156 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,700
of 263,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virologica Sinica
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,679,413 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 156 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.9. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,614 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.