↓ Skip to main content

Outcomes in patients with over 1-year follow-up after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM)

Overview of attention for article published in Surgical Endoscopy, November 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
Title
Outcomes in patients with over 1-year follow-up after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM)
Published in
Surgical Endoscopy, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00464-016-5130-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marc A. Ward, Matt Gitelis, Lava Patel, Yalini Vigneswaran, Joann Carbray, Michael B. Ujiki

Abstract

Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a promising therapy in the treatment of achalasia. The study was designed to report outcomes, including quality of life, in patients with at least 1-year follow-up. Patients from an institutional review board-approved protocol underwent POEM and were followed prospectively. Health-related quality of life was measured preoperatively and 1 year post-operatively using Short Form-36 Health Survey version 2 (SF-36v2). Comparisons were made with patients from a prospective database who underwent laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) over the same period. Paired t tests were used to analyze all normally distributed data, while Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to analyze SF-36 data, as it does not follow a normal distribution. We analyzed 41 consecutive POEM patients with at least 1-year follow-up. Significant improvements in quality of life between baseline and 1 year were found in role limitations due to physical health (81.8 ± 25.8 vs. 65.9 ± 31.6, p = 0.01) and social functioning (83 ± 19.1 vs. 64.6 ± 31.3, p = 0.01). When compared to 24 patients who underwent LHM, there was no difference in average Eckardt scores (0.9 ± 1.6 vs. 1.0 ± 1.3, p > 0.05) or incidence of PPI use (43.5 vs. 47.5 %, p = 0.71). However, when looking at just type III patients, POEM patients had a higher remission rate (100 vs. 62.5 %) and significantly lower post-operative Eckardt scores at 1 year (1.1 vs. 3.1, p < 0.05). The average myotomy length of type III achalasia patients undergoing POEM was 18.6 cm (±6.9) compared to 10.3 cm (±1.0) in LHM patients (p < 0.01), which may have contributed to this difference. POEM provides a significant quality of life benefit at 1 year while having similar relief of dysphagia and post-operative PPI use compared to LHM. Type III achalasia patients may have better outcomes with POEM compared to LHM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 50%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 42%
Psychology 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,042,773
of 9,240,924 outputs
Outputs from Surgical Endoscopy
#2,226
of 2,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,603
of 260,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Surgical Endoscopy
#103
of 147 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,240,924 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,982 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,025 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 147 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.