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The effect of Nordic hamstring strength training on muscle architecture, stiffness, and strength

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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115 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
227 Mendeley
Title
The effect of Nordic hamstring strength training on muscle architecture, stiffness, and strength
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00421-017-3583-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kayla D. Seymore, Zachary J. Domire, Paul DeVita, Patrick M. Rider, Anthony S. Kulas

Abstract

Hamstring strain injury is a frequent and serious injury in competitive and recreational sports. While Nordic hamstring (NH) eccentric strength training is an effective hamstring injury-prevention method, the protective mechanism of this exercise is not understood. Strength training increases muscle strength, but also alters muscle architecture and stiffness; all three factors may be associated with reducing muscle injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of NH eccentric strength training on hamstring muscle architecture, stiffness, and strength. Twenty healthy participants were randomly assigned to an eccentric training group or control group. Control participants performed static stretching, while experimental participants performed static stretching and NH training for 6 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention measurements included: hamstring muscle architecture and stiffness using ultrasound imaging and elastography, and maximal hamstring strength measured on a dynamometer. The experimental group, but not the control group, increased volume (131.5 vs. 145.2 cm(3), p < 0.001) and physiological cross-sectional area (16.1 vs. 18.1 cm(2), p = 0.032). There were no significant changes to muscle fascicle length, stiffness, or eccentric hamstring strength. The NH intervention was an effective training method for muscle hypertrophy, but, contrary to common literature findings for other modes of eccentric training, did not increase fascicle length. The data suggest that the mechanism behind NH eccentric strength training mitigating hamstring injury risk could be increasing volume rather than increasing muscle length. Future research is, therefore, warranted to determine if muscle hypertrophy induced by NH training lowers future hamstring strain injury risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 115 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 227 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 223 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 56 25%
Student > Bachelor 36 16%
Unspecified 35 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 12%
Researcher 15 7%
Other 58 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 82 36%
Unspecified 54 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 36 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 34 15%
Engineering 7 3%
Other 14 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 71. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2017.
All research outputs
#234,670
of 13,394,413 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#70
of 2,969 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,932
of 257,666 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#3
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,394,413 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,969 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,666 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.