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The Acceptability of Parenting Strategies for Grandparents Providing Care to Their Grandchildren

Overview of attention for article published in Prevention Science, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#38 of 658)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
Title
The Acceptability of Parenting Strategies for Grandparents Providing Care to Their Grandchildren
Published in
Prevention Science, August 2013
DOI 10.1007/s11121-013-0428-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

James N. Kirby, Matthew R. Sanders

Abstract

Despite the evidence supporting parenting programmes as a pathway to reduce and prevent childhood emotional and behavioural problems, these programmes still have low rates of uptake by families in the community. One way of increasing the participation rates of families in parenting programmes is to adopt a consumer's perspective to programme design and development. This study sought to examine whether grandparents providing regular care to their grandchildren viewed the strategies advocated in a parenting programme developed specifically for them as being acceptable and useful, and whether there were barriers to programme use. Forty-five grandparents, with an average age of 61.4 years (SD = 5.0), participated in the study. Grandparents provided between 11 and 20 h of care per week to their grandchildren, who were on average 4.5 years old (SD = 2.4), with the majority being boys (60 %). Results revealed that grandparents found the strategies promoted in the parenting programme highly acceptable and useful and were likely to use the strategies. Barriers to using specific strategies included time demands and belief that a specific strategy would not work. The implications of these findings are discussed within the context of consumer involvement in programme design and development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 6 25%
Researcher 5 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 21%
Student > Master 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 1 4%
Other 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 50%
Social Sciences 6 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Computer Science 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2016.
All research outputs
#560,268
of 12,342,754 outputs
Outputs from Prevention Science
#38
of 658 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,004
of 149,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Prevention Science
#2
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,342,754 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 658 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 149,558 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.