↓ Skip to main content

Diversification rates in Ctenodactylidae (Rodentia, Mammalia) from Mongolia

Overview of attention for article published in Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, January 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2 Mendeley
Title
Diversification rates in Ctenodactylidae (Rodentia, Mammalia) from Mongolia
Published in
Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/s12549-016-0265-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adriana Oliver, Oscar Sanisidro, Bayarmaa Baatarjav, Ichinnorov Niiden, Gudrun Daxner-Höck

Abstract

Gundis, or comb rats, are rodents of the family Ctenodactylidae. Extant gundis are restricted to Africa and represent a vestige of the diversity that the ctenodactylids attained at both palaeoecological and palaeobiogeographical levels. Here, we present an updated review of the Ctenodactylidae from the Valley of Lakes, Mongolia, based on the study of large collections now available. We have recognised 13 valid species of ctenodactylids grouped into five genera: Karakoromys, Huangomys, Tataromys, Yindirtemys, and Prodistylomys. The ctenodactylids show an initial burst in diversification in the early Oligocene followed by a sequential generic extinction of Karakoromys, Huangomys, and Tataromys. A maximum richness peak at the late Oligocene was followed by a profound diversity crisis. Yindirtemys, the only surviving genus, persisted into the Miocene, joining three Prodistylomys species. These last representatives of the group disappeared coinciding with the late Xiejian faunal reorganisation (Mongolian biozone D).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 50%
Professor 1 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 1 50%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,378,746
of 9,128,382 outputs
Outputs from Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments
#97
of 145 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,643
of 311,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,128,382 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 145 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,795 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.