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Astrobiological Phase Transition: Towards Resolution of Fermi’s Paradox

Overview of attention for article published in Origins of Life & Evolution of the Biosphere, October 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 359)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Astrobiological Phase Transition: Towards Resolution of Fermi’s Paradox
Published in
Origins of Life & Evolution of the Biosphere, October 2008
DOI 10.1007/s11084-008-9149-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Milan M. Ćirković, Branislav Vukotić

Abstract

Can astrophysics explain Fermi's paradox or the "Great Silence" problem? If available, such explanation would be advantageous over most of those suggested in literature which rely on unverifiable cultural and/or sociological assumptions. We suggest, instead, a general astrobiological paradigm which might offer a physical and empirically testable paradox resolution. Based on the idea of James Annis, we develop a model of an astrobiological phase transition of the Milky Way, based on the concept of the global regulation mechanism(s). The dominant regulation mechanisms, arguably, are gamma-ray bursts, whose properties and cosmological evolution are becoming well-understood. Secular evolution of regulation mechanisms leads to the brief epoch of phase transition: from an essentially dead place, with pockets of low-complexity life restricted to planetary surfaces, it will, on a short (Fermi-Hart) timescale, become filled with high-complexity life. An observation selection effect explains why we are not, in spite of the very small prior probability, to be surprised at being located in that brief phase of disequilibrium. In addition, we show that, although the phase-transition model may explain the "Great Silence", it is not supportive of the "contact pessimist" position. To the contrary, the phase-transition model offers a rational motivation for continuation and extension of our present-day Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) endeavours. Some of the unequivocal and testable predictions of our model include the decrease of extinction risk in the history of terrestrial life, the absence of any traces of Galactic societies significantly older than human society, complete lack of any extragalactic intelligent signals or phenomena, and the presence of ubiquitous low-complexity life in the Milky Way.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 5%
United States 2 5%
Sweden 1 3%
Italy 1 3%
Unknown 33 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 26%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Other 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 8 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Computer Science 4 10%
Neuroscience 4 10%
Other 12 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 51. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2019.
All research outputs
#337,188
of 13,459,972 outputs
Outputs from Origins of Life & Evolution of the Biosphere
#8
of 359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,871
of 151,797 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Origins of Life & Evolution of the Biosphere
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,459,972 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 151,797 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them