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Physician role in physical activity for African-American males undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Physician role in physical activity for African-American males undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, December 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3505-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Faustine Williams, Kellie R. Imm, Graham A. Colditz, Ashley J. Housten, Lin Yang, Keon L. Gilbert, Bettina F. Drake

Abstract

Physical activity is recognized as a complementary therapy to improve physical and physiological functions among prostate cancer survivors. Little is known about communication between health providers and African-American prostate cancer patients, a high risk population, regarding the health benefits of regular physical activity on their prognosis and recovery. This study explores African-American prostate cancer survivors' experiences with physical activity prescription from their physicians. Three focus group interviews were conducted with 12 African-American prostate cancer survivors in May 2014 in St. Louis, MO. Participants' ages ranged from 49 to 79 years, had completed radical prostatectomy, and their time out of surgery varied from 7 to 31 months. Emerged themes included physician role on prescribing physical activity, patients' perceived barriers to engaging in physical activity, perception of normalcy following surgery, and specific resources survivors' sought during treatment. Of the 12 men who participated, 8 men (67%) expressed that their physicians did not recommend physical activity for them. Although some participants revealed they were aware of the importance of sustained physical activity on their prognosis and recovery, some expressed concerns that urinary dysfunction, incontinence, and family commitments prevented them from engaging in active lifestyles. Transitioning from post radical prostatectomy treatment to normal life was an important concern to survivors. These findings highlight the importance of physical activity communication and prescription for prostate cancer patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 21%
Unspecified 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 12%
Researcher 4 12%
Other 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 29%
Unspecified 8 24%
Psychology 4 12%
Sports and Recreations 4 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 12%
Other 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2017.
All research outputs
#3,189,131
of 12,219,104 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#755
of 2,346 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,489
of 330,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#48
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,219,104 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,346 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,988 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.