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The effects of alcohol-related harms to others on self-perceived mental well-being in a Canadian sample

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Public Health, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
Title
The effects of alcohol-related harms to others on self-perceived mental well-being in a Canadian sample
Published in
International Journal of Public Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00038-016-0924-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Candace Lewis-Laietmark, Ashley Wettlaufer, Kevin D. Shield, Norman Giesbrecht, Nicole April, Mark Asbridge, Colleen Dell, Jürgen Rehm, Tim Stockwell

Abstract

To examine (1) the harms related to the drinking of others in five Canadian provinces, stratified by socio-demographic variables, and (2) the relationship between these harms and mental well-being. A telephone survey sampled 375 adults from British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia. Harms related to the drinking of others were measured through 16 questions in the domains of psychological, physical, social, and financial harms. Self-perceived mental well-being was measured with his or her mental well-being. In 2012, 40.1% of Canadian adults surveyed experienced harm in the previous year related to the drinking of another person. These harms were more frequent among people who had a higher education level, were widowed, separated, divorced or never married, and were employed. Psychological, physical, and financial harms related to the drinking of others were significantly correlated to a person's mental well-being. Harms related to the drinking of others are prevalent in this Canadian survey. Furthermore, the psychological, physical, and financial harms related to the drinking of others negatively impact the mental well-being of the affected individuals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 9 39%
Lecturer 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 5 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 11 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 26%
Psychology 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,284,387
of 12,096,974 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Public Health
#205
of 919 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,162
of 328,553 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Public Health
#11
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,096,974 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 919 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 328,553 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.