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Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the supplementary motor area (SMA) influences performance on motor tasks

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
Title
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the supplementary motor area (SMA) influences performance on motor tasks
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, December 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00221-016-4848-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. E. Hupfeld, C. J. Ketcham, H. D. Schneider

Abstract

The supplementary motor area (SMA) is believed to be highly involved in the planning and execution of both simple and complex motor tasks. This study aimed to examine the role of the SMA in planning the movements required to complete reaction time, balance, and pegboard tasks using anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), which passes a weak electrical current between two electrodes, in order to modulate neuronal activity. Twenty healthy adults were counterbalanced to receive either tDCS (experimental condition) or no tDCS (control condition) for 3 days. During administration of tDCS, participants performed a balance task significantly faster than controls. After tDCS, subjects significantly improved their simple and choice reaction time. These results demonstrate that the SMA is highly involved in planning and executing fine and gross motor skill tasks and that tDCS is an effective modality for increasing SMA-related performance on these tasks. The findings may be generalizable and therefore indicate implications for future interventions using tDCS as a therapeutic tool.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 72 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 27%
Student > Bachelor 15 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 10%
Unspecified 5 7%
Other 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 20 27%
Unspecified 11 15%
Psychology 11 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 11%
Other 15 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2017.
All research outputs
#3,024,303
of 13,219,565 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#361
of 2,269 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,416
of 374,326 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#10
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,219,565 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,269 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 374,326 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.