↓ Skip to main content

Prediction of non-recovery from ventilator-demanding acute respiratory failure, ARDS and death using lung damage biomarkers: data from a 1200-patient critical care randomized trial

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, November 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
Title
Prediction of non-recovery from ventilator-demanding acute respiratory failure, ARDS and death using lung damage biomarkers: data from a 1200-patient critical care randomized trial
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13613-016-0212-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jens-Ulrik S. Jensen, Theis S. Itenov, Katrin M. Thormar, Lars Hein, Thomas T. Mohr, Mads H. Andersen, Jesper Løken, Hamid Tousi, Bettina Lundgren, Hans Christian Boesen, Maria E. Johansen, Sisse R. Ostrowski, Pär I. Johansson, Jesper Grarup, Jørgen Vestbo, Jens D. Lundgren

Abstract

It is unclear whether biomarkers of alveolar damage (surfactant protein D, SPD) or conductive airway damage (club cell secretory protein 16, CC16) measured early after intensive care admittance are associated with one-month clinical respiratory prognosis. If patients who do not recover respiratory function within one month can be identified early, future experimental lung interventions can be aimed toward this high-risk group. We aimed to determine, in a heterogenous critically ill population, whether baseline profound alveolar damage or conductive airway damage has clinical respiratory impact one month after intensive care admittance. Biobank study of biomarkers of alveolar and conductive airway damage in intensive care patients was conducted. This was a sub-study of 758 intubated patients from a 1200-patient randomized trial. We split the cohort into a "learning cohort" and "validating cohort" based on geographical criteria: northern sites (learning) and southern sites (validating). Baseline SPD above the 85th percentile in the "learning cohort" predicted low chance of successful weaning from ventilator within 28 days (adjusted hazard ratio 0.6 [95% CI 0.4-0.9], p = 0.005); this was confirmed in the validating cohort. CC16 did not predict the endpoint. The absolute risk of not being successfully weaned within the first month was 48/106 (45.3%) vs. 175/652 (26.8%), p < 0.0001 (high SPD vs. low SPD). The chance of being "alive and without ventilator ≥20 days within the first month" was lower among patients with high SPD (adjusted OR 0.2 [95% CI 0.2-0.4], p < 0.0001), confirmed in the validating cohort, and the risk of ARDS was higher among patients with high SPD (adjusted OR 3.4 [95% CI 1.0-11.4], p = 0.04)-also confirmed in the validating cohort. Early profound alveolar damage in intubated patients can be identified by SPD blood measurement at intensive care admission, and high SPD level is a strong independent predictor that the patient suffers from ARDS and will not recover independent respiratory function within one month. This knowledge can be used to improve diagnostic and prognostic models and to identify the patients who most likely will benefit from experimental interventions aiming to preserve alveolar tissue and therefore respiratory function. Trial registration This is a sub-study to the Procalcitonin And Survival Study (PASS), Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT00271752, first registered January 1, 2006.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Other 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 57%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 9 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2016.
All research outputs
#10,848,806
of 18,905,383 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#551
of 874 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,305
of 406,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#46
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,905,383 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 874 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 406,541 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.